Preschoolers, the Bible & the True Survival Guide

Each Tuesday morning I have the joy of visiting our local preschool to do a Bible talk with the kids. It’s short and sometimes chaotic but it’s one of my favourite things to do.

I arrive as the kids are finishing morning tea and occasionally while I’m waiting a parent comes in to drop off a child and get to say hi and introduce myself. This week a woman I’ve meet a few times before came in with her preschool daughter and school aged son. As I was chatting to them both the son asked if he could stay for the ‘survival talk’. I must have looked confused because mum immediately told me that’s what her daughter calls the Bible talk when she tells them about it at home. I’m sure that’s because to a 4-year-old the word survival and Bible sounds so similar. But it’s actually a good way to think about the Bible.

In fact I hope all of us will think of the Bible as a survival tool. It’s essential for our faith

Consequently, faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word about Christ. Romans 10:17

… and for wisdom in this life

My son, if you accept my words
and store up my commands within you,
turning your ear to wisdom
and applying your heart to understanding –
indeed, if you call out for insight
and cry aloud for understanding,
and if you look for it as for silver
and search for it as for hidden treasure,
then you will understand the fear of the Lord
and find the knowledge of God.  Proverbs 2:1-5

… and for eternal life

Simon Peter answered [Jesus] “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.” John 6:68

I’m sure my preschool friend doesn’t yet grasp all of this. But she knows that what she hears about God is important and so, naturally, she goes home and tells others about it. I wonder what would happen if all of us read the Bible like it was our survival guide, then told others about it too?

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God redeems the despised things

At church we’re coming to the end of a 14 week sermon series in Levitcus and Numbers. I’ll admit that I was not particularly looking forward to 3 months in these Old Testament books but I’ve loved the way we have been constantly pointed to Jesus. I have been (once again) amazed at what Jesus achieved for us on the cross.

Today’s sermon was from Numbers 21

They traveled from Mount Hor along the route to the Red Sea, to go around Edom. But the people grew impatient on the way; they spoke against God and against Moses, and said, “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in the desert? There is no bread! There is no water! And we detest this miserable food!”

Then the Lord sent venomous snakes among them; they bit the people and many Israelites died. The people came to Moses and said, “We sinned when we spoke against the Lord and against you. Pray that the Lord will take the snakes away from us.” So Moses prayed for the people.

The Lord said to Moses, “Make a snake and put it up on a pole; anyone who is bitten can look at it and live.” So Moses made a bronze snake and put it up on a pole. Then when anyone was bitten by a snake and looked at the bronze snake, he lived.

I was especially struck by this thought from the sermon:

A few chapters earlier (Num 11:6) the people had complained about the manna God gave them to eat. They took what should have been hope of life (food in the middle of the desert) and made it detestable. In chapter 21 God takes what is detestable (a snake) and turns it into hope of life.

Then this from John 3:

14 Just as Moses lifted up the snake in the desert, so the Son of Man must be lifted up, 15 that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life.

Once again, God takes what looks detestable and turns it into the ultimate hope for life everlasting.